A DEFINITION OF BOULDER, COLORADO



 

Here I am. Settled at last in Boulder,Colorado. Time to begin blogging again. Time to clarify these new surroundings. Boulder has me buffaloed. So, here are my thoughts.

 

A Definition of Boulder, Colorado

  It is a place where there’s a lot of sex going on.

A place where you can quickly cross the street after you punch the big silver button and the little white-man figure lights up. A safe crossing place. A place with too many cars. A place where everyone rides a bicycle. A place where exhaust fumes are so potent so you can’t walk along the sidewalk on Arapahoe Ave. A place of dizziness. A scary place.

    It is a place of green. Fresh green trees. Summer shade. Where noxious weeds are the battle ground, not Afganistan.

    A place where the newspaper is called a camera.

    It’s a place where the language has strange words that begin with “eco.” Ecodoggiebag. Ecoefficient. Ecogreenoffice. Ecologic. Econatural. Ecofuture. Ecohandyman, ecoarts, ecochange, ecogreen.

    A place where my dog can poop on the floor of McGuckins Hardware Store and no one gets angry. A place where I can’t shop because my dog is the attraction, not me, the customer. In this place there are many Golden Labs. Outside of this place there are horses.

    A young place. There are no old people. A place with no gray hairs, white hairs, or blue hairs. They are sent to Arizona or Florida.

    The place is terrifying. Where I worry about death by a bicycle racing along Boulder Creek Bike Path. Along the path floods rage. Soggy wet sleeping bags and undergarments lay in fearsome dark places abandoned in the mud along the Creek.

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A Secret Gem of Arizona: The Desert Caballeros Western Museum


         


 

THE NAVAJO Charles M. Russell 1919

Permanent Collection of Desert Caballeros Western Museum

It’s hard to believe that the tiny town of Wickenburg, Arizona (population something less than 7,000) could have one of the best and most comprehensive collections of early Western cowboy art. Just about anybody who is anybody as a 20th century Western artist is represented here. In this charming setting, you’ll find the entire panorama of Western art including works by the early explorer artists: landscape painters, the Taos Society, founders of the Cowboy Artists of America, and examples of more recent schools with new perspectives from impressionism to realism. You’ll see George Catlin, Albert Bierstadt, Frederic Remington, Joseph Henry Sharp, Oscar Berninghaus, Joe Beeler, Harrison Begay, and even a stunning large bronze by Earle Heikka.

This museum took my breath away! It’s small and intimate. You feel you belong there. You can almost hear the artist’s voices spinning tall tales. I know my favorite Charlie Russell was there telling one of his yarns filled with his delightful profanity. Bob Fjeld, a handsome docent, said he preferred Russell’s bronzes, but for me, Heikka is the prize winner. I think Bob must be one of my long lost Norse kin from Montana.

And then, before you can catch your breath you’re over at The Old Livery Mercantile, Inc. on Tegner Street trying on Cowboy Hats and buying real Arizona silver and turquoise jewelry. Brett and Mary Ann Gerasim at the Old Livery have a motto. “Don’t hurry—this is Wickenburg!”

I love Wickenburg.


BUFFALOed awarded First Place Grand Prize in 2009 Indie Book Awards Contest


As I told you guys, Western Fiction may be shattered but it’s not wiped out.   Yes!  A western has taken the Indie Prize.  No fantasy, sc fi, romance, mystery, adventure, crime, or horror.  Western writers–keep ’em movin’. 

From Historical Novel Society Reviews:

Young Norwegian immigrant Ovidia Odegard expects to find buffalo when she signs on as Cowboy Artist Charlie Russell’s hired girl. Instead, she finds Indians more educated than most whites, social order as stratified as Eastern society, and an assortment of boozers and bamboozlers, women chasers, and gamblers.

BUFFALOed is available at www.amazon.com/Buffaloed-Fairlee-Winfield/dp/1439200998/

SPIRIT OF THE WEST


   

Our Spirit of the West <b>ARIZONA DEEUUD</b>

Our Spirit of the West ARIZONA DEEUUD

 I went to a meeting of my Meet-Up group “Spirit of the West” last night. Most of us go dressed in western gear. One of these days I’ll learn how to put pictures on this blog and I’ll post them. My novel BUFFALOed is about the famous Cowboy Artist, Charlie Russell, who was in large part responsible for creating the all-American hero, the cowboy. So, I like to hang out with these people. I met a fellow there, C. L. “Lee” Anderson who is a true 1880’s Arizona Cowboy. He’s a re-enactor and does he ever look authentic. In programs for schools and at special events, Lee and his trusty horse Dusty bring 1880’s Arizona back to life. The real Arizona cowboy, not the Hollywood or Charlie Russell myth. Lee says the American cowboy never would have existed without the Spanish Colonial Vaqueros, the ones who knew how to handle horses.